Wednesday, 30 September 2009 16:13

DJ and Me

“Do me a favor, Mrs. Lanier, and shut your left eye,” the instructor said. “My left eye?” “Yes” he replied, “When you see the target clearly, shut your left eye and shoot.” After several misses in a row all I could think was yeah right. Obligingly I did what he asked and wham, the target exploded. “Now, just do the same thing for me again.” Wham, the second target broke. Wow, what do you know, two in a row!

Published in Elizabeth Lanier

It was September 9th, eight days after the West Virginia season opener for mourning doves. At the Shenandoah Valley Sportsmen Club, opening-day hunters had maxed out their limit within hours – arriving home in plenty of time for lunch and chores.

Published in Wingshooting
Tuesday, 15 September 2009 01:00

9½ Hours With Gil & Vicki Ash

If you’ve ever watched Gil and Vicki Ash on their instructional DVDs, you walk away with the feeling that you really want to spend some time with these earnest Texans. They’re smart, funny and engaging. Well, what we discovered over a 9½ hour workshop with them is that they are exactly the same people in person as they are on your TV screen.

Published in Feature Stories
Tuesday, 08 September 2009 01:00

Peer Review: The Browning Silver Lightning

I’ll be the first to admit that I may have been suffering from a mid-life crisis, but ultimately I really wanted to prove that a mainstream semi-auto like the Browning Silver Lightning still had what it takes in our digital era of composite gladiators such as the Maxus and Vinci.

Published in Peer Review
Tuesday, 01 September 2009 07:46

Beat By a Girl

Elizabeth Lanier is taking some well-deserved time off. She invited Shotgun Life Editor, Deborah McKown, to contribute a guest column this month.

Published in Elizabeth Lanier

Wouldn’t it be great if four-time Olympic shooting champ Kim Rhode finally appeared on a box of Wheaties?

As legend has it, if it had been up to Wayne LaPierre, Executive Vice President of the National Rifle Association, Kim would’ve been beaming her warm smile on the Breakfast of Champions back in 1996, when at age 16, as the youngest member of the U.S. Summer Olympic Team, she won her first Gold Medal for double trap.

Friday, 31 July 2009 01:00

Passing the Baton: Part II

In the July issue of her Shotguns and She-nanigans column Elizabeth told us why she dropped off her two sons at the NRA Whittington Adventure Camp. Now in Part II of “Passing the Baton,” she tells us more about the camp and the benefits it providers to campers and their parents.

Published in Elizabeth Lanier

You probably already have some preconceived notions about your dream shotgun, and that is just fine. But sometimes it pays to seek advice from someone who has had literally hundreds of shotguns pass through their hands, had so many different stocks touch their cheek, fondled so many receivers. Lucky for me, I am one of those folks, so hopefully what I’m going to tell you might help with your future purchase.

What is the most important quality to seek in your next shotgun? A beautiful piece of walnut, out of this world engraving, strength to hold up to a million rounds, a stock that fits you perfectly? Or what? To me all these factors are important, as are others, but I think the best quality a shotgun can have is feel. That’s what to look for first.

It’s difficult to describe feel, just as it’s difficult to describe love at first sight. You just know both when you feel either. Once you love how a shotgun feels you are going to thoroughly enjoy it. You are going to have great confidence in it. After that you can always add such luxuries as a custom stock, custom engraving, custom checkering, whatever. But if you don’t start out loving the feel of a shotgun the cards are stacked against you ever shooting that gun all that well.

3731
Berettas seem to be great feeling semi-autos to most shotgunners – from the 303 to the 390 – to this 391.

 

When it comes to semi-autos I think Beretta attained the feel I’m talking about with the models 303, the 390, and now the many versions of the 391. I don’t think it’s easy to incorporate a good-feeling quality into a semi, but I do believe Beretta has done it. It’s more than balance I’m talking about, but good balance is certainly a big part of having a shotgun feel right. A shotgun with great feel should move almost effortlessly to the target – pitch or feathered. Such a shotgun will probably let you think it actually weighs less than it really does. You should look forward to picking up and fondling such a shotgun every chance you get.

Have you ever picked up a Perazzi? If you have not done so I urge you to do that – do it even if you cannot afford one. There’s something about virtually every Perazzi I pick up that just sings feel. From the initial pick up to the shouldering to the mounting to the swinging, even to the sound of a Perazzi clicking shut – for many it is a love affair at first sight or first feel. This seems to be true no matter the barrel length for this company has a way of matching barrel weights to the receiver, stock and fore-end so that balance and feel are not compromised. To experience feel first hand just pick up and handle a Perazzi intended for field shooting – or one of their sporting clays models.

The English got feel right over 100 years ago – with their side by side shotguns, first with hammer guns, but later with sidelocks and then even boxlocks. Not many of us are going to have the opportunity to pick up, fondle and swing a Purdey or a Boss, but maybe one day you will have a chance to do this with one of the lesser known old English doubles – perhaps an Army & Navy, a Webley Scott (this company made many fine English double guns sold in other names), a Cogswell & Harrison, a Reilly or one from a number of other English makers that don’t bring the prices of a Purdey, a Holland or several others. If you ever get the chance to handle a gun like this you will see what I mean by feel.

Enough about feel – let’s move to fit. Whatever new gun you buy – it probably won’t fit you perfectly. However, this does not mean you have to change the beautiful stock the gun came with – at least hopefully not. Length of pull can be adjusted with a thicker or thinner recoil pad. If the comb is too high you or a stock person can sand away until that portion of the fit is correct, and then minimal refinishing could be all you need to fix the looks of the walnut.

You could also have the stock you buy made into an adjustable comb stock – or it may come with one. These are sort of ugly but not double ugly. You could add self-adhesive Moleskin (available at drugstores) to the comb if the stock is too low – sort of double ugly but serviceable.

The best way to determine gun fit is to have a pattern paper or steel plate to shoot at. The premise should be to shoot over and over – say at least five times – at the same pointing spot on the paper or the steel plate. Is your new gun shooting high, low, left, right or some combination of two of those? No aiming for this work. Just pull the gun up and shoot.

0554
Caesar Guerini over and unders tend to have great feel in the opinion of numerous shooters.

Don’t overlook the recoil pad. Sad to say some recoil pads put on factory shotguns these days are abominable. This is not to say such pads don’t have recoil-absorbing qualities. That’s not what I’m getting at here. A recoil pad should be a significant aid in helping with a perfect gun mount. Too many pads are a significant handicap in allowing the shooter to make a great gun mount. With some pads the consistency is simply too sticky. Those that are cause a lot of gun mounting problems. Another problem is caused by sharp pad edges, especially at the top of the pad. Consider the type of pad that has a plastic insert at the top – a feature that can be a big factor in reducing gun mounting hang ups. Further, rounded edges all around the pad help guard against sharp edges gouging into the shoulder area. The recoil pad is perhaps the most overlooked aspect of new or used shotgun buying. Of course, the buyer can always add the recoil pad of his or her choice after purchase.

For hunting, as opposed to competition shooting, I actually like most shotguns fitted with either a plastic butt plate or simply a checkered butt. These are hunting guns, most of which are shot minimally, as opposed to competition guns which are shot one heck of a lot. With a hunting gun the plastic butt pad or checkered butt stock tends to reduce back-end weight a tad – and certainly facilitates an easy, unobstructed gun mount.

In wrap up I will make one additional shotgun make suggestion for you to consider picking up, shouldering and swinging at the gun shop. This would be the Caesar Guerini, and the company makes many models, those for hunting, skeet, trap and sporting clays. This company goes to special pains to make the guns balance just ahead of the hinge pins or trunnions – and they do this regardless of barrel length. To me all the Guerini over and unders that I have handled have a great feel.

Nick Sisley has been a full-time freelance outdoor writer since 1969. He writes a regular shotgun column in Wildfowl magazine, Sporting Clays magazine, the Skeet Shooting Review and others. He's authored eight books and penned thousands and thousands of magazine articles. He can be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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Shooting Tips, Gear & Shotguns

Published in Guns

Sign-up at Shotgun Life to Receive Daily Shooting Tips From the Library of Gil & Vicki’s Optimum Shotgun Performance (OSP) Shooting School

PIKESVILLE, Md. – July 20, 2009 – Shotgun Life announced today the new Gil & Vicki Ash OSP store for their instructional books, DVDs and other products and services designed to help shotgun owners improve their game.

The new OSP store on Shotgun Life is the first online retail venture outside of Gil &
Vicki’s own domain. The venture underscores the common commitment by OSP and Shotgun Life to make the shotgun sports more enjoyable and rewarding for shooters of all experience levels.

In conjunction with its new OSP store, Shotgun Life launched its free “Shotgun Life’s OSP 3-Minute Coach.” Subscribers will receive shooting tips via email Monday through Friday that are excerpted from Gil & Vicki’s many books and DVDs. Shooters can sign up now at http://www.shotgunlife.com.

The Shotgun Life OSP store is located at

http://www.ospschool.com/products_programsshotgunlife.html.

“Shotgun Life helps shooters steer clear of the conflicting instructional advice that’s dished up in the all those online forums,” said Gil. “We saw Shotgun Life as an extension of our philosophy, and that’s to get new shooters started on the right foot and help experienced shooters figure out those little tics and quirks that drive them crazy.”

“As the first online magazine devoted to wing and clays shooting, Shotgun Life is in a great position to help Gil & Vicki reach as many shotgun owners as possible,” said Irwin Greenstein, Publisher of Shotgun Life. “Shotgun Life is free, timely and women-friendly – breaking down the barriers that have held back so many shooters and advertisers frustrated with the limitations of the six-times-per-year publishing cycle that still persists as the industry model.”

Through OSP, Gil & Vicki provide a complete instructional package. No other instructors in the world have the depth of products, knowledge and experience for successfully teaching clays and wing shooting. Each year, Gil & Vicki add new products and services so that OSP continues to meet the ever-growing needs of the shotgun sports community.

The Shotgun Life OSP store will feature Gil & Vicki’s best-selling books and DVDs.

The books include:

  • If It Ain’t Broke, Fix It!
  • Sporting Clays Consistency: You Gotta Be Out of Your Mind!
  • The Coaching Hour Chronicles series

DVDs include:

  • 14 Tips to Better Shotgunning
  • How to Practice & Understanding the Move
  • Strategy & How to Play the Game
  • Perfecting Your Gun Mount
  • The Three Routines in Sporting Clays
  • Choke Selection Made Simple

Visit www.ospschool.com to learn more.

Shotgun Life

Shotgun Life is the first online magazine devoted to the best in wing and clays shooting. For more information about Shotgun Life visit http://www.shotgunlife.com.

Media Contacts:

For Shotgun Life:
Bernard + Associates
Ryan Holmes
(775) 323-6828

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

For OSP:
Media Direct
Kim Cahalan
(309) 944.5341

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in Press Releases
Wednesday, 08 July 2009 01:01

Passing the Baton

As I studied our two teenage boys standing in the kitchen not too long ago, I thought they bore a strong family resemblance but they could not possibly be related to me.

Published in Elizabeth Lanier
Page 2 of 6

About Shotgun Life

Shotgun Life is the first online magazine devoted to the great people who participate in the shotgun sports.

Our goal is to provide you with the best coverage in wing and clays shooting. That includes places to shoot, ways to improve your shooting and the latest new products. Everything you need to know about the shotgun sports is a mouse-click away.

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